ARTH 260 * Introduction to Art History * Professor Sarah Benson * Spring 2005




syllabus
schedule | requirements | PDF

images
Unit 1: week 1 | week 2 | week 3 | week 4
Unit 2: week 5 | week 6 | week 7 | week 8
Unit 3: week 10 | week 11 | week 12

blackboard

>>assignments
    section: week 2 | week 3 | week 4 | week 5 | week 6 | week 7 | week 8 | week 10 | week 11 | week 12 | week 13 | week 14
   paper 1 | paper 2 | paper3 | journal

online resources
Cornell Library | Grove Dictionary of Art | Encyclopaedia Britannica | Oxford Dictionary of Art | Oxford Companion to Western Art | Oxford Dictionary of Architecture | History of Art Dept. | Cornell Homepage
WEEK 14

Quiz on week 12 and week 13 images, including Modern Times

To complete this week's assignment you must visit the Johnson Museum. Selected photographs will be on view for our class in the Study Gallery (lowest level) from April 19-24 only. Get a list of works.

Discussion topic:
Metropolis to Dustbowl: Documentation and persuasion in 1930s photographs

Assignment:
Complete the readings, view our class exhibit in the Study Gallery (lowest level) of the Johnson Museum, and write up your analysis to these questionsin your journal. All analysis and answers must be your own in your own words.

Reading and Museum questions:


1) What according to OLSON are the rhetorical goals or claims of Norman ROCKWELL's Four Freedoms posters? How does ROCKWELL express these claims in visual terms?
2) How do ROCKWELL's posters translate particular articles from the "Bill of Rights" into scenes of American daily life? Cite specific articles and the visual icons that ROCKWELL associates with them. Are there some freedoms in the posters for which you can find no precedent in the "Bill of Rights"? (see WEEK 2 section assignment)
3) Are there parallels between these idealized visions of American identity and daily life and the urban and rural photographs on view for us at the Museum this week? Do the documentary images seem to be merely reporting on the state of the Union or do they, like ROCKWELL's posters, make arguments of their own?
4) Pick one urban and one rural image from the Museum exhibit and compare their view of life in early 20 th -century America. Then suggest your own comparison to other images or objects we have seen this semester. Consider images of cities, nature, domestic life, labor, consumption, industrialization, and so on.

Norman ROCKWELL (1894-1978)
Freedom of Speech
story illustration, Saturday Evening Post, March 6, 1943
Oil on canvas
117.3 x 91 cm
Stockbridge, MA: Norman Rockwell Museum
Norman ROCKWELL (1894-1978)
Freedom to Worship
story illustration, Saturday Evening Post, March 6, 1943
Oil on canvas
117.3 x 91 cm
Norman ROCKWELL (1894-1978)
Freedom from Want
story illustration, Saturday Evening Post, March 6, 1943
Oil on canvas
117.3 x 91 cm
Norman ROCKWELL (1894-1978)
Freedom from Fear
story illustration, Saturday Evening Post, March 6, 1943
Oil on canvas
117.3 x 91 cm


Read more about these terms in the Oxford English Dictionary :
epideictic
rhetoric

Readings:
* STOKSTAD , AH , "The Rise of Modernism in Europe and North America," pp. 1018-1019; "American Scene Painting and Photography," "Federal Patronage for American Art During the Depression," "The Harlem Renaissance," pp. 1068-1074; "Art in Mexico Between the Wars," 1078-1079
* OLSON, "Portraits in Praise of People: A Rhetorical Analysis of Norman Rockwell's Icons in Franklin D. Roosevelt's 'Four Freedoms' Campaign"
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